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Hogarth judge

December 2016

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Hogarth judge

All human societies are anti-God

Christianity Today says:
Recent events have left Christians wondering how they stand in American society. In the last year, we at Christianity Today have received several manuscripts by prominent Christian intellectuals suggesting that the United States has become definitively and irreversibly anti-God. Other Christians continue to urge us to do good with the hope that we can make a difference.


I think you missed the third and true alternative. The United States has always been definitively and irreversibly anti-God, because all human societies are anti-God, since they are made up of human beings.

The notion that at some golden age in the past, but not as far back as Eden, humans were not quite the sinners than they are today is un-Scriptural and just not true. All have sinned, all have fallen short of the glory of God, and the notion that people weren't quite the sinners they are now in 1950 or 1910 or 1880 or 1620 or whatever your choice of Golden Age happens to be, just doesn't hold water.

Our wicked and ignorant ancestors kept slaves, deprived workers of their hire, and persecuted their neighbours for breaches of Pharasiacal proprieties. I suspect that in every age, peoples' worst sins are invisible to them, because the human social fabric is so deeply stained by sin that it all seems the same colour at the time. The sins that are denounced from the pulpit in one generation seem to later generations to be bogus or trivial. The sins that seem obvious and rampant to later generations were socially accepted in the societies of sinners they took root in. Only distance lets us see what they are. I have every confidence that future generations will look back at us and see much the same thing.

Michael Lesy's book Wisconsin Death Trip is useful for those who believe that a golden age of piety and patriotism existed in the late nineteenth century in America. The sons of the pioneer showed a disturbing penchant for going insane and murdering each other. The Golden Age just never happened.

Comments

Tangental to your point...

But I really grooved on WDT. Was sorely tempted to drive to Black River Falls the last time I was in Wisconsin, but it's really not the same. It's easy to imagine that it was an abberation, that all the insanity, starvation, poisonings and such were specific to that particular town, but they're not.

I think that we tend to view the past as being perfect more because the authors/writers/journalists seemed a little more reserved then...
Michael Lesy's book Wisconsin Death Trip is useful for those who believe that a golden age of piety and patriotism existed in the late nineteenth century in America. The sons of the pioneer showed a disturbing penchant for going insane and murdering each other.

This sounds very much like a book I should like to read. Is it easy to buy, or should I borrow your copy?
It's a picture book.

I'll try to bring it up this weekend, if I remember.